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“A Christmas Carol – A Ghost Story of Christmas” at Steele Canyon High School – December 12-16, 2018

The Steele Canyon High School Drama Department and Instrumental Music Department present the age-old beloved classic, A Christmas Carol – A Ghost Story of Christmas. Show dates are Wednesday through Saturday, December 12, 13, 14 & 15 at 7 PM with a matinee performance on Sunday, December 16 at 2 PM.  All performances are in the Steele Canyon High School Theatre, 12440 Campo Road, Spring Valley. Tickets for all performances are $10 each and may be purchased online at http://www.showtix4u.comor purchased at the box office on the evening of performances. Set in Victorian England, the play is adapted by Michael Wilson from the original work of Charles Dickens. This theatrical and spirited version puts the fantastical qualities of the classic tale center stage. A swirling, dancing chorus of ghosts weaves through this uplifting holiday story. Traditional Christmas music accompanies this tale of redemption, magic and hope that will certainly put you in the Christmas “spirit”. This production is made possible by the generous support of Primary Residential Mortgage, Inc. and the Michael J. Slater Family.

About the Steele Canyon Players & Instrumental Music Department –

Under the direction of Theatre Director, Nicole LaBella and Musical Director, Heather Luck, students in the Steele Canyon High School drama and music departments produce an annual Fall Semester play and an annual Spring Semester Musical. The Spring Production of The Sound of Music was named the Best High School Musical at the 2018 Broadway San Diego Awards after the first year of entering the competition that celebrates excellence in high school musical theatre.

 

 

EMERGENCY INFORMATION: Wildfire Smoke and Face Masks for Protection in Dangerous Conditions

Surgical and dust masks WILL NOT protect you from the dangers of breathing Wildfire smoke… Choose a mask called a “particulate respirator”.

Wildfire smoke can irritate your eyes, nose, throat, and lungs. It can make you cough and wheeze, and can make it hard to breathe. If you have asthma or another lung disease, or heart disease, inhaling wildfire smoke can be especially harmful. If you cannot leave the smoky area, good ways to protect your lungs from wildfire smoke include staying indoors and reducing physical activity.

Wearing a special mask called a “particulate respirator” can also help protect your lungs from wildfire smoke  Respirator masks labeled N95 or N100 provide some protection – they filter ‐ out fine particles but not hazardous gases (such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and acrolein). This type of mask can be found at many hardware and home repair stores and pharmacies and online. Your local health agency may also have these masks.

Choose an N95 or N100 mask that has two straps that go around your head. Don’t choose a one ‐ strap paper dust mask or a surgical mask that hooks around your ears – these don’t protect against the fine particles in smoke. Choose a size that fits over your nose and head and under your chin. It should seal tightly to your face. Please note that these masks don’t come in sizes that fit young children and will not seal well. They also will not seal well on people with beards.

Don’t use bandanas or towels (wet or try) or tissue held over the mouth and nose. These may relieve dryness but they won’t protect your lungs. Using a respirator mask can make it harder to breathe, which may make the existing medical conditions worse as it takes extra effort to breath through them and can make it uncomfortable to use them for very long.

Throw away your mask when breathing through it gets difficult, if it gets damaged or if the inside gets dirty. Use a new mask every day if you can. For more information, search for “wildfire smoke” on www.doh.wa.gov

 

A Musical Salute to America’s Veterans at the Alpine Library – November 10, 2018

Our music, our history, their service

Join us for a musical celebration of America’s Veterans at the Alpine Library on Saturday, November 10 at 3:30 pm. This one-hour salute to our veterans will include authentic historical music from our nation’s history. Musical selections will include many favorites (e.g. Battle Hymn of the Republic) and other gems that may be new to you (e.g. The Constitution and the Guerriére and many more). This musical tribute to service will also include wonderful American songs that celebrate our nation’s ideals, along with the Armed Services Medley.  The Alpine Library is located at 1752 Alpine Blvd Alpine, CA 91901. For more info please call us at (619) 445-4221 or email albranch1752@gmail.com

Statement By GEORGE BARNETT: Seeking Re-Election to the Alpine Community Planning Group Board 2018

*Please note that the Alpine Community network does not endorse ANY CANDIDATE. All candidates are welcome to submit information to be posted so the community of Alpine can be better informed.

October 2018 – My name is George Barnett and I am seeking re-election to the Alpine Community Planning Group.  A resident since 1999, my wife, two of our sons and all of our grandkids live here.

My top priorities are:

One, involving townspeople in the Community Plan Update; a Supervisor Dianne Jacob supported effort to define the future nature of Alpine while preserving our rural, mountain village character.

Two, strongly supporting the rights of private property owners.

Three, seeking opportunities for more park land, and for supporting the improvement of our 20-year old middle school sports playing fields.

I am involved in numerous Community Activities:

Alpine High School Citizens Committee as a Member and former officer – working diligently for a local control Alpine High School.

Alpine Education Foundation:  Treasurer & Director – working with others raising funds for, and delivering enhanced S.T.E.A.M. education programs, to Alpine schools.

Back Country Land Trust:  Vice President & Director – conserving Open Space lands and operating Environmental Preserves (like Wright’s Field) for the public’s use and enjoyment.

Chairperson of the Public Action & Major Public Policy Subcommittee, Planning Group – reaching-out to Alpiners on major public policy land use planning issues.

Secretary & Member of the Parks & Recreation Subcommittee, Planning Group – reaching-out to Alpiners to improve & expand parkland.

I am endorsed by the ‘real’ Republican Party of San Diego and by many Alpine Parents & residents.

 

These are my Positions on Major Public Policy:

One, Support for Alpine’s Businesses.  The health of local businesses is vital.  It is a role of the Group to encourage and support infrastructure needed for local businesses to thrive.  To date, over $10 million in improvements to storm water drainage, curbs, sidewalks, pathways, and so on have been completed.  The Group has prioritized roadway needs, including better ways to protect our school children when walking to and from schools.

Two, Support for Alpine’s Schools.  Having our own Alpine high school is critical to Alpine land use planning and zoning.   Young families are not coming to Alpine because we have no high school.  Established Alpine families are leaving Alpine for the same reason.  There is every reason for families to move to Alpine, with its K-8 Destination School District of the East County; but for the lack of a high school.  A high school will have profound beneficial impact on Alpine.  It fulfills the town’s character.  And everything about a high school impacts the role of the Planning Group, whose planning for traffic circulation, roads-pathways-sidewalks, parkland, housing, electric power, water, sanitation, and environmental impacts is crucial.

Three, Support for the Environment.  The Planning Group serves a vital role in supporting the environment by reviewing and approving property development proposals.   It compels developers to ‘mitigate’ the detrimental impacts of their development projects on the town.  Developers contribute cold hard cash into two special accounts – one for community parkland and one for school district infrastructure and facilities.  And too, developers often contribute superb environmental open-space properties to the community for its use as passive parkland.

My campaign statements and detail s of my proposed direction for Alpine follows at the League of Women Voters’ “VotersEdge” :

 

https://votersedge.org/ca/en/ballot/election/73-429158/address/null/zip/91901/contests/contest/18990/candidate/144725?&date=2018-11-06

 

George Barnett

EMAIL: BigGeorge8888@gmail.com

 

 

Alpine Family Haircuts – $3 Off Your FIRST VISIT!

Get $3 Off Your FIRST VISIT with any service $14.95 and up! Cut, Color, Highlights, Perm, Clipper Cuts & more at very low prices! Open 7 Days a Week – Mon-Weds 12pm to 7pm and Thurs-Sun 9am to 7pm. Walk-in’s are ALWAYS WELCOME! We are located at 2353 Alpine Blvd. (Next to the Alpine Beer Tasting Room) (619) 445-2022

Learn How Your Garden Can Become a CERTIFIED WILDLIFE HABITAT – October 20, 2018

Did you know that Alpine is the NATION’S FIRST Certified Community Wildlife Habitat?

Carlette Anderson, director of Alpine’s Community Wildlife Habitat Program, will explain the process of certifying your garden with the National Wildlife Federation at the Alpine Library on October 20, 2018 at 2pm. On May 1, 1998. Alpine was designated the Nation’s First Certified Community Wildlife Habitat with the National Wildlife Federation. Today there are more than 100 Community Wildlife Habitats in the USA. In order to keep our designation we are required to continue to encourage Alpine residents to certify their gardens.

The Alpine Library is located at 1752 Alpine Blvd, Alpine, CA 91901. For more information call (619) 445-4221 or email Jenne Bergstrom. Visit our website at www.sdcl.org and our Facebook Page at www.facebook.com/AlpineLibrary

 

Warrior Spirit Conference & Ceremony to Heal Historical Trauma – October 8, 9 & 10, 2018

Calling Upon the Warrior Spirit to Heal Historical Trauma Conference and Ceremony – October 8, 9 & 10, 2018 at Viejas Casino in the Oak Ballroom.

Medicine carrier Karen Waconda from Isleta Pueblo, NM & owner of Native Dreams Tangerine from Taos Pueblo, NM & Chocktaw-Chickasaw, OK will be conducting nightly Healing Ceremonies. Starting Sunday Night at 6pm,  October 7 through Tuesday October 9 at the Calling Upon the Warrior Spirit Conference and Ceremony. Elders 55+ are FREE!  Please visit the website for more information or to register: www.viejas.com/warriorspirit/

Gymtrix Flip for Friday “SCAVENGER HUNT” – September 14, 2018

KIDS! Come have fun at our Gymtrix Flip for Friday “SCAVENGER HUNT NIGHT”! Enjoy fun activities or just hang out with friends! No membership required, kids ages 4-18 are welcome. Cost is $15. Pizza, drinks & ice cream will be available. Flip for Friday is every Friday from 6:30pm to 10pm (You can come at 5pm for just $5 more!) Gymtrix is located at 2358 Tavern Rd. (Next to Boulder Oaks Elementary School) For more info call 619-659-8772 or email Karen Smith at gymtrix@att.net. Visit our website at www.gymtrixinc.com

FOUND DOG: Female Brown Dog Found on Sunrise Highway in Mount Laguna – September 2, 2018

LOCATION_DESCRIPTION: Found brown female dog on Sunrise Hwy in Mount Laguna California on September 2, 2018. Please call Amber at 619-625-0324 or EMAIL HERE

Fire Prevention Efforts Were Underway at Wright’s Field in Alpine Before West Fire

The Wright’s Field area in Alpine owned by the Back Country Land Trust is outlined in red and green. (Google Earth map courtesy of Back Country Land Trust)

By Alpine Chamber of Commerce  – August 2018

With the West Fire bearing down from the east end of Alpine on July 6,2018 the natural park known as Wright’s Field in the center of Alpine was already well-prepared. Fortunately, firefighters stopped the blaze just before it got into the natural preserve loved by walkers, hikers, bike and horseback riders. In recent years the Back Country Land Trust, which owns the 230-acre field,  had been working with firefighters on fire prevention measures well before the West fire. Those efforts are continuing….

The Wright’s Field property on the right side of the fence has been cleared to provide defensible space for fire prevention. (Back Country Land Trust photo.)

The July 6 West Fire that destroyed or damaged dozens of homes and buildings in Alpine came close to Wright’s Field before firefighters stopped the blaze. Thanks to the Back Country Land Trust (BCLT) which owns the 230-acre natural park in the center of this rural community and local fire agencies, the field has already been undergoing fire prevention efforts in recent years.

“We’re all very familiar with the park,” Chief Bill Paskle of the Alpine Fire Protection District said later, praising BCLT’s fire prevention efforts for the preserve. “We do walk it.  I walk it regularly as a private citizen.” Firefighters and the BCLT have partnered for fire prevention and quick access to the park for almost seven years, said Jon Green, BCLT’ program and outreach director. “The Back Country Land Trust takes our obligations for fire safety very seriously while also balancing the needs of habitat,” Green said.

Wright’s Field, part of this area’s rich history, is popular with residents, visitors and tourists for walking, hiking, bike riding, horseback riding and just relaxing. “The first thing is that it’s a natural preserve, so we can’t go in there heavy-handed,” Paskle said.  “But we do look at the vegetation around the edges of the field to make sure it’s trimmed.  They (BCLT) do a fabulous job of that.” The fire chief said the district has supported BCLT’s efforts to get grants to maintain Wright’s Field and the agency has a good relationship with Green. “The BCLT does not own all of the open space in the center of town,” Green noted. “We own about half of the open space out there.” He said he is listening to fire agencies, taking their advice and continuing to improve fire prevention at Wright’s Field.

 

BCLT, a member of the Alpine Mountain Empire Chamber of Commerce, completed a very large project last year to reduce vegetation that might fuel fires in or near the field. “It was our first priority – removing non-native species,” Green said. “We also removed several eucalyptus trees.”

The second priority, he said, was thinning the native shrubs so there’s space between them and that took money. BCLT obtained a $108,000 CAL FIRE grant through the Urban Corps to get both priorities taken care of between 2016 and 2017. Green said the land trust also got an $18,000 Sunrise Powerlink Community Protection grant through a fire mitigation fund to upgrade and repair all gates at Wright’s Field.

The gates’ project was important because firefighters and other emergency responders need to easily get big rigs and other vehicles in and out of the field, Green said. “We increased the number of access points to Wright’s Field from five to eight,” he said.   “All the new gates have a 30-foot width for fire department access.” Firefighters had to use one of the new gates earlier this year to rescue an injured horseback rider in the field, said Green.

“Going forward, we are consulting with Alpine Fire, CAL FIRE and various local wildlife agencies to plan for more defensible space projects,” he said. “We want to be planning ahead, not be behind.”

(Photo, map courtesy of BCLT)